1.17 Quality of Schools

Indicator 1.17 - Quality of Schools


Here we show scores from national coordinated examinations for elementary school children and the percentage of certified teachers in East Iceland compared to results nationwide.


Results



a. National coordinated exams (average score) undergone by elementary school children (4th, 7th and 10th grade).  Results in East Iceland compared to national average.


Elementary school Children in 4th, 7th and 10th grade in Iceland undergo annually national coordinated exams according to Compulsary School act 2008 no 91.  Icelandic and Math are tested in all three age groups plus English in 10th grade.

The purpose of the tests is to inform students, parents and schools about how they stand compared to Curriculum and thereby aid in setting emphasis for the following school year.

Average scores for all schools and areas can be viewed in annual reports issued by Study Evaluation Institute of Iceland (Námsmatsstofnun).

Below are average scores in East Iceland compared to nationwide average scores.  Annual reports (in Icelandic) from Study Evaluation Institute of Iceland can be found here.

The grades are normal distributed on a scale ranging from 0 – 60, where the national average is 30 and the standard deviation is 10.  This makes comparison between years, cohorts and subjects easier than the traditional scale of 0 - 10.

Results for 4th grade 2009 – 2014

Click for larger images.


Figure 1. Icelandic - Average normalized test score of 4th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.Figure 1.  Icelandic - Average normalized test score of 4th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.






Figure 2. Math - Average normalized test score of 4th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.Figure 2. Math - Average normalized test score of 4th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.









Results for 7th grade 2009 – 2014

Click for larger images


Figure 3. Icelandic - Average normalized score of 7th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.Figure 3.  Icelandic - Average normalized score of 7th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.




Figure 4. Math - Average normalized score of 7th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national averageFigure 4.  Math - Average normalized score of 7th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average








Results for 10th grade 2009-2014

Click for larger images

Figure 5. Icelandic – Average normalized score of 10th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.Figure 5. Icelandic – Average normalized score of 10th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.




Figure 6. Math – Average normalized score of 10th graders in East Iceland 2009-2014 compared to national average.Figure 6. Math – Average normalized score of 10th graders in East Iceland 2009-2014 compared to national average.




Figure 7. English – Average normalized score of 10th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.Figure 7. English – Average normalized score of 10th graders in East Iceland 2009 – 2014 compared to national average.






Click here for results from 2007-2012 on 0-10 scale.


Updated:   February 5 2016

Source: Námsmatstofnun (e. Study evaluation institute). (2009-2015). Retrieved  23.6.2015 from http://www.namsmat.is/vefur/samr_prof/skyrsla_samramd_prof.html




           

b. Percent of  teachers without certification in primary schools in East Iceland vs. nationally.


The percentage of teachers without certification has been high in East Iceland compared to national average.  However this percentage is getting lower in East Iceland as in other parts of the country. 



Figure 8: Percent of teachers without certification in the years 2004 - 2013FIgure 8:  Percent of teachers without certification in the years 2004 - 2014

Updated: February 5 2016
Source: Hagstofa Íslands (Statistics Iceland). Retrived: February 4 2016 from  http://px.hagstofa.is/pxis/pxweb/is/Samfelag/Samfelag__skolamal__2_grunnskolastig__1_gsStarfsfolk/SKO02301.px/table/tableViewLayout1/?rxid=ac3268c2-f2d0-4c06-ae43-73a20fc8e65f 



Metrics, Targets and Monitoring Protocol


Metrics: What is measured?

  1. Results from national coordinated exams (4th, 7th and 10th grade) in East Iceland vs. nationally. (Project effect: induced).
  2. Percent of teachers without certification in primary schools in East Iceland vs. nationally. (Project effect: induced).


Monitoring Protocol

  1. Námsmatsstofnun (Study evaluation institute), collects information about results from national coordinated examinations and publishes on their website. It is possible to get customized analysis of data published on their website doesn't   suffice. Information will be collected annually.
  1. Information on percent of teachers without certification in primary schools is available at Statistics Iceland and updated once a year.


Targets

Expectations rather than targets apply for this indicator

  1. Average grades in East Iceland greater than or equal to national average.
  1. Percent of teachers without certification in east Iceland less than or equal to national average.


Possible countermeasures

Not applicable, monitoring only.


Changes of indicator

In  forth phase of the initiative the numbers of the sustainability indicators were changed.  This indicator was originally number 7.2 and is referenced as 7.2 in early documents of the project.


Rationale for Indicator Selection

New big companies can affect nearby schools. Increased number of inhabitants during construction and operational phases of the projects means more children and increased work load in schools.  

This includes both the direct effects of employees and contractors, as well as the indirect demand generated by people moving to the project area in association with job opportunities created directly or indirectly by the projects.

The object of the schools therefore will be  to maintain the former quality of education to an increasing and possibly a more culturally diverse student population.