1.11 Demographics in Eastern Iceland

Indicator 1.11 - Demographics in Eastern Iceland

Visir_1_11_lydfraediHere you can find information about gender/age distribution and number of inhabitants in East Iceland.


 

Results

Results on population are from January 1st. each year.  



a. Gender and age structure in East Iceland, compared to the country as a whole


 1.11en_mynd1_2017Figure 1. Population pyramids for Central East Icelanda compared to whole Iceland in 2017.

a: Municipalities included:  Seyðisfjörður, Fjarðabyggð, Fljótsdalshreppur, Borgarfjarðarhreppur, Breiðdalshreppur and Fljótsdalshérað

Click here to view population pyramids for Central East Iceland and whole Iceland in 2002-2017.

Age- and gender distribution in villages
Click here to see population pyramids for single villages in East Iceland.

Updated:  July 26 2017
Source
: Statistics Iceland (2017). Retrieved July 13 2017  from

http://px.hagstofa.is/pxis/pxweb/is/Ibuar/Ibuar__mannfjoldi__2_byggdir__sveitarfelog/MAN02005.px/table/tableViewLayout1/?rxid=d621d889-27a1-4e5e-a553-df162cb24f48



b. Number of inhabitants in East Iceland.



1.11en_mynd2_2017Figure 2: Number of inhabitants in Central East-Iceland 2003 - 2017 (Seyðisfjörður, Fjarðabyggð, Fljótsdalshreppur, Borgarfjarðarhreppur, Breiðdalshreppur and Fljótsdalshérað municipalities ) a.


 

Table 1. Population of East Iceland (Seyðisfjörður, Fjarðabyggð, Vopnafjarðarhreppur, Fljótsdalshreppur, Borgarfjarðarhreppur, Breiðdalshreppur, Djúpavogshreppur, Fljótsdalshérað, Sveitarfélagið Hornafjörður  municipalities) a and percentage of national population.

  Total population of East Iceland a
Percentage of national population
 2003  11,611  4.0
 2004  11,754  4.0
 2005  12,293  4.2
 2006  13,697  4.6
 2007  15,366  5.0
 2008  14,002  4.4
 2009  12,849  4.0
 2010  12,459  3.9
 2011  12,306  3.9
 2012  12,356  3.9
 2013  12,434  3.9
 2014  12,524  3.8
 2015  12,496  3.8
 2016  12.452
 3.7
 2017  12.497  3.7



1.11en_mynd3_2017Figure 3.  Population trend in Iceland and East Iceland (Seyðisfjörður, Fjarðabyggð, Vopnafjarðarhreppur, Fljótsdalshreppur, Borgarfjarðarhreppur, Breiðdalshreppur, Djúpavogshreppur, Fljótsdalshérað, Sveitarfélagið Hornafjörður  municipalities)a from 1998 (Index 1998 = 100).

a:  Division into municipalities as of 1 January 2017.

 

Updated: July 26 2017
Source: Statistics Iceland retrieved July 12 2017  from 

http://px.hagstofa.is/pxis/pxweb/is/Ibuar/Ibuar__mannfjoldi__2_byggdir__sveitarfelog/MAN02005.px/



Metrics, Targets and Monitoring Protocol


What is measured?

  1. Gender and age structure in East Iceland compared to National population. (Project effect: induced).
  2. Total population in East Iceland (Project effect: induced).

Monitoring Protocol

  1. Information from Statistics Iceland will be analyzed further by breaking it down according to age and sex in East Iceland. Information is sought from the Icelandic Regional Development Institute or an employee will be assigned to gather the information. This information will be collected every five years.
  2. Information from Statistics Iceland will be collected annually.


Targets

  1. Balanced age structure and sex ratio in East Iceland relative to national age distribution with a regression coefficient (r²) = 1.0
  2. Increase in population in East Iceland.

Possible countermeasures

Not applicable, monitoring only.


Changes of indicator

In  fourth phase of the initiative the numbers of the sustainability indicators were changed.  This indicator was originally number 1.1 and is referenced as 1.1 in early documents of the project.


Rationale for Indicator Selection


Gender and age balanced communities are an indicator of a stable society. The gender and age structure of many communities in East Iceland has been affected by the “pull” effect of economic growth and associated employment opportunities in the capital Region in and around Reykjavík.

The report on the socio-economic impact of the Fjarðaál project links this to a limited range of employment opportunities and high proportions of low-paying jobs in East Iceland.

The development of the Kárahnjúkar and Fjarðaál projects might lead to changes in the demographic structure of East Iceland and individual communities during the construction and operation phases. Some of these effects will be direct, for instance, the in-migration to East Iceland of employees and their families. Indirect effects include the spin-off effects of the projects in terms of employment opportunities in companies providing goods and services to the projects and opportunities arising from the economic development of the East.

 

Baseline